boarding up windows for hurricane

Is Your Home Prepared?

Every year like clockwork, Florida hurricane season arrives. It officially starts at the beginning of June, and it doesn’t go away until the very end of November. Protecting your home during this period is key, and you need to do everything in your power to shield it from the wind and rain. One of the most critical parts of your home to protect during hurricane season are your windows. Your windows are a considerable investment, and you’ll want to prepare them to withstand hurricane-force winds way in advance of the season. The team at USA Home Improvement has helped many homeowners prep their windows to withstand the roughest weather.

Besides your financial investment, there’s also a very real danger associated with not prepping your windows for hurricane season. Shards of broken glass can become dangerous weapons when hurled through the air at hurricane-force speeds, so you need to ensure that your windows remain intact during the storm.

Start Your Hurricane Preparations Early

Even though you know that hurricane season officially starts at the beginning of June, it’s challenging to determine exactly when a hurricane will hit. Forecasts can be unpredictable, making it difficult to find out if and when a hurricane will hit your area. The best thing you can do is to prep your windows at least a month ahead of hurricane season.

Use Hurricane Shutters

Installing hurricane shutters is another excellent way to protect your windows from the damaging effects of a severe storm. Accordion shutters easily unfold and lock into position once the wind begins to roll in, and they’re fairly cheap at $12 per square foot. Bahama shutters look like window awnings, and they provide shade in addition to shielding your windows from rain and wind.

Install Hurricane Windows & Doors

An excellent but costly option is to install hurricane resistant impact windows. These windows are strong enough to withstand the debris that’s tossed around during a storm. They’re also very expensive, costing anywhere between $35 and $50 per square foot and up. You also need to have them professionally installed ahead of time, so if you’re considering this option, look into it before hurricane season begins.

Use Hurricane Fabric

Hurricane fabric is an excellent way to keep your windows protected when prepping for hurricane season. This stretchable fabric features trampoline-like material that bounces objects and debris off of it, keeping the windows and the contents of the house safe. A significant benefit is that you can have it installed permanently or temporarily, and it’s ideal for people who want to get all of their hurricane prep done up front. Its construction also allows for light to filter through, allowing you to see outside without issue. Costs run anywhere from $12 to $15 per foot, making it a relatively cost-effective solution for people with a lot of windows. A professional must install this fabric.

Board Up Your Windows With Plywood

Covering up your windows with plywood is an excellent way to protect the glass underneath from brutal winds. The good thing about boarding up your windows is that it’s a simple last-minute option if you can’t prepare your windows ahead of time. One important thing to remember as you’re putting the boards up is to label them, so you know exactly which board goes with which window. That way, you can quickly place the boards the next time a storm blows through. Plywood costs up to $20 per 4’x8′ sheet, making it an affordable option for many. One downside is that you won’t be able to see outside once the plywood is up and the storm hits.

Hurricane season is inevitable, but with the proper precautions, you can protect your windows. Contact the team at USA Home Improvement at 844-468-7244 to learn more about your options.

Josef Amir

Josef Amir

Managing Memeber at USA Home Improvement
As a certified general contractor and managing member of USA Home Improvement, Josef is committed to improving energy efficiency for South Florida homeowners and businesses alike.
Josef Amir

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